Profiles in Land and Management – Root Down Farm

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As part of our Profiles in Land and Management series, this month we share the story of Root Down Farm in Pescadero, California.

In 2014, Dede Boies started Root Down Farm in one of the most expensive counties in the United States. While finding affordable land and housing and starting a new business was a substantial challenge, her unwavering commitment to growing the best food she could for her customers in a way that also improves the health of the land helped Root Down Farm not just survive but grow.

From an innovative lease with a local conservation trust that recognizes and rewards the ecosystem services of her adaptively grazed livestock and conservation practices to premium prices from customers who support nutrient-dense and lovingly raised products, Dede’s work at Root Down Farm is a powerful example of a young farmer using regenerative practices to create meaningful opportunities for her business as well as ecosystem services and nutritious food for her community.

To read more on this profile, please click here.

The Profiles in Land and Management Series by guest contributor Kevin Watt features the work of innovative ranchers and land managers who are achieving economic and ecological benefits on working lands. Kevin served as the TomKat Ranch Land & Livestock Manager until 2017 and now works on research, outreach and special projects for the ranch.

*The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author(s). Publishing this content does not constitute an endorsement by the Western Landowners Alliance or any employee thereof either of the specific content itself or of other opinions or affiliations that the author(s) may have.*

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