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USDA, Partners Unveil Sage Grouse Management Map

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“The USDA’s NRCS is offering people across the West a handy new tool to help them understand and visualize sage grouse territory.

Partnering with the University of Montana and other entities, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) has created a new map through the Google Earth Engine, as part of their ongoing Sage Grouse Initiative.

The map (which you can see here) has multiple functions. Viewers can toggle layers on the map, showing sage grouse management zones and “priority areas for conservation.” It also includes indices of ecosystem resilience (ranging from low to medium to high) and tree canopy cover data.

All told, the sage grouse map covers 100 million acres and eight states.”

Read more from New West or read the press release from USDA.

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